Take Time to Pray…

Like so many working professionals, I’ve been ordered to work from home to help “flatten the curve” and slow the spread of Coronavirus. I’ve never worked from home full time before, and I’ve always said that I prefer to go into the office; I feel I’m more productive there. After last last week, however, I am quite pleased with the productivity I have delivered, but I also find it difficult to shut down the computer and walk away from work for a while. Indeed, my normal routine is way out of whack!

One of the areas that has suffered most is my treasured morning time. In “normal” times – is there any such thing? – my day begins in Scripture and prayer. But I have quickly fallen into the work from home habit of firing up my laptop first thing in the morning to make sure something hasn’t happened overnight that needs my immediate attention and, Viola!, my work day begins as my Bible time fades into the background.

But Jesus Himself would often slip away to the wilderness and pray.

Luke 5:16

Yesterday, I read this account in Luke about Jesus’ ministry. It seems that, everywhere He went, there were crowds. Crowds demanding His time. Crowds seeking a miracle. Sick people in need of healing and demon-possessed people needing release. As I read about this, I could relate. If I let it, my work will take up all of my time and energy, especially in these trying times. If I’m not careful, I could work myself into a state of exhaustion and ineffectiveness.

But then along comes this little verse. Jesus needed a break. Jesus needed to refresh and reenergize. Jesus needed to talk with His Father. Indeed, Jesus – the Son of God – needed to pray. And to meet that need, He removed Himself from crowd to seek solitude with His Heavenly Father. Yes. Jesus needed to pray.

If the Son of God needed to take time by Himself to pray, what about me? And what about you?

I love it when God speaks to me through His Word. Upon completing my daily reading yesterday, I opened my Christian Planner and I updated my prayer list. Then, I prayed through it.

I have many good friends who work from home full time. They offer some good advice that I am applying, beginning today (second Monday working from home):

  • Go to bed at your normal time
  • Set your alarm and get up at your normal time
  • Take a shower
  • Brush your teeth
  • Dress for work
  • Take your breaks
  • Walk away when you need to
  • Leave your work in your home office at the end of the workday

In other words, establish your routine and stick with it. Of course, these days, there are interruptions. These are strange and trying times. Duty may call at odd hours as I do my part to help my employer manage through this. But, this morning, I set my alarm, brewed my coffee, read my Bible, said my prayers and wrote this post. This feels good. This feels right. And, who knows, I may come to love this working from home gig. Just maybe.

Soli DEO Gloria!

Image credit: YouVersion Bible App

Yes, I’m Worried. But…

What strange times we are living in. People are experiencing an array of emotions – fear, anxiety, worry, anger, angst…

I must confess that I worry more about the long-term impact Coronavirus will have on our society, our economy, and our world than I do about the possibility of my actually catching the virus myself. I worry about the hourly workers whose workplaces are closed, some indefinitely. Yes, I confess. I worry.

The Lord bless you and keep you; The Lord make His face shine on you, and be gracious to you; The Lord lift up His countenance on you, and give you peace.

Numbers 6:24-26


“Worry.” Ugh. Worry is evidence of misplaced trust, even of weak faith. It is also a tool the enemy uses to try and separate us from God. For me, when I worry, I want to “do something” to solve the problem, sometimes allowing that perceived need to rob me of my morning time in Scripture. See what I mean?

This morning I woke up early. Worried. So I got up, brewed a pot of coffee, and opened my Bible reading plan. And this is what I read – the traditional benediction offered at the conclusion of worship in so many churches. And I’m reminded that, as a Christian, I am in the world, but not of the world. Worry is displaced by faith, comfort and peace. Just as it should be.

Y’all, we will get through this.

Soli DEO Gloria!

Image credit: Youversion Bible App

Is Anything too Difficult for God?

“Is anything too difficult for the Lord?” Sometimes, important points are made through the asking of a rhetorical question.

The Bible in One Year reading plan begins in the book of Genesis. I always enjoy reading these accounts of God interacting with His people as He foreshadows His ultimate act of salvation through Jesus. Here, the context is God’s promise that Sarah, elderly and beyond normal childbearing years, will have a son from whom God will build a vast nation (Israel). What Sarah doesn’t know is that, from this lineage will come Jesus, Son of God and Savior of mankind!

I am also greatly encouraged in seeing how God does magnificent work through imperfect people; sinners like me.

Is anything too difficult for the Lord? Of course not! Amen!

Soli DEO Gloria!

Image credit @youversion

The Majesty of Creation

During a recent visit to the ophthalmologist for my wife’s glaucoma, the doctor used a large illustration of the eye to explain what was going on. As she explained the eye structure to us, I saw clear evidence of the Creator. There is no way the human eye evolved by chance, from nothing. No way.

I speak often about how God reveals Himself through Scripture. He also reveals Himself through His magnificent Creation. The Apostle John, in describing Jesus, says this in part, “All things came into being through Him, and apart from Him nothing came into being that has come into being.” (John‬ ‭1:3‬ ‭NASB‬‬)

Want to see Jesus today? Just look around you. Consider nature and the order of the universe. Consider our environment and how it is set up to support all kinds of life. Speaking of all kinds of life…wow, such variety! To dismiss the Architect of all of this is to dismiss our Lord Himself.

🎶 O Lord, our Lord, how majestic is your name in all the Earth! 🎶

Happy Lord’s Day, time to prepare for worship!

Soli DEO Gloria!

Image credit @youversion

Hidden in my Heart

Busy, Busy, Busy! As I wrote in my last post, I sometimes find myself so embroiled in the busyness of life that I sacrifice my morning reading and prayer time in order to get to the office a bit earlier or tend to some long-neglected household chore. I recently went through a period of this that was complicated by international travel and major changes at work. We all experience this from time to time. How does the Christian keep proper focus when life seems to be spinning at a rate faster than we can control?

I have hidden your Word in my heart, that I might not sin against you.

Psalm 119:11

This verse was part of my morning reading this past Thursday and I am so thankful for this reminder. Hiding God’s Word in my heart means that I can call on certain passages of Scripture when faced with critical life circumstances or decisions. It means that I carry with me an overall understanding of who God is and what He wants for His people, all based on reading studying my Bible. I can draw from these things when the enemy seeks to lure me in a different direction. No, I’m not some freakish “super Christian” or a religious fanatic. I’m simply a man who loves his God and wants to live my life in alignment with His Word.

How does one hide God’s Word in his heart? Well, a few things come to mind:

  1. I know that I am most tuned in to God when I keep my morning appointment with Him. Getting up early, reading my Bible and praying keep me dialed in. Touching base with God each morning sets the foundation for my day, and when I allow myself to be robbed of this time, there is a distinct difference in my outlook, my attitude, and my productivity. I must cherish this time and not let anything stand in the way of my morning devotion.
  2. Memorizing passages of Scripture is another way to hide God’s Word in your heart. We all know John 3:16, right? Just in case, “For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whoever believes in Him shall not perish but have everlasting life.” What a comfort that is to me when life seems so harrowed that the day goes by in a blur. Or when I catch myself in a sin and the guilt monster starts to eat away at my conscience. Admittedly, I could do much better here, but there are a number of verses that I know by heart so I can call on them. Sometimes, God gives me a nudge with a passage of Scripture. I love that.
  3. There is a podcast called Truth for Life that I like to listen to when I walk. Alistair Begg is an honorable man of God who is very gifted at preaching and teaching God’s Word. There are a number of other quality podcasts out there featuring teachers faithful to the intent and meaning of Scripture.
  4. Find a church home and get involved! Weekly worship is a fundamental need. In addition to participation in worship, find a way to serve outside of worship. I know many who claim that church is not a necessary ingredient to being a Christian. While this is technically correct, I believe it is misguided. We are the church. We exist to worship God, study His Word, partake of the Sacraments, and support one another. I believe this to be critically important.

The second half of this verse is important also. Why do I seek to hide God’s Word in my heart? Having God’s Word in my heart helps keep me from sinning against Him. It helps me make decisions that align with His Word. Oh, make no mistake, I sin. I sin often. The Apostle Paul referred to himself as the “chief of sinners” (1 Timothy 1:15) and lamented often that he catches himself doing things (sinning) that are not pleasing to God (see Romans 7:15ff). I’m no Paul for sure, but I can sure relate to these passages. So hiding God’s Word in my heart does not make me perfect, but it often causes me to change direction or make a decision different from what I was originally considering. I want my life to please God. His Word, and His Word alone, is my moral compass.

Thomas Cranmer (1489-1556) famously penned this prayer:

“Blessed Lord, who hast caused all holy Scriptures to be written for our learning; grant that we may in such wise hear them, read, mark, learn, and inwardly digest them, that by patience and comfort of thy holy Word, we may embrace, and ever hold fast, the blessed hope of everlasting life, which thou hast given us in our Savior Jesus Christ. Amen.”

Book of Common Prayer

That, my dear friend, is what it means to hide God’s Word in your heart. May God richly bless you in the coming week and beyond.

Soli DEO Gloria!

Image Credit: YouVersion Bible App

(c) workisministry.com 2019

Time Flies…

“Time flies when you’re having fun,” someone once said. Or, how about this: “Time flies when you’re busy at work.” Whatever the reason, time flies! It’s been almost five months since I last posted here. I was thinking about that over the weekend, and I realized that this ministry is important. But in order for God to use it, I must do the work. So, here I am. I’m back.

“So, what happened?” you may be asking. Or maybe not. In any event, I’m going to tell you. The succinct answer is, “Life happened.” What does that mean, really? It means I’ve been very busy at work, spending more Saturdays than not at the office. As of now I am reclaiming my weekends. It means I became a bit lazy in my morning routine. As of today I am reclaiming my mornings. It means I let the busyness of life interfere with this ministry. There is a proper balance here; I just need to find it. I am trusting God to help me do that.

That’s about all I have to say this morning. As you can see, the purpose of this post is not really to impart any Scriptural wisdom; that comes next. The purpose of this post is simply to get me writing again. To reengage and recommit.

I will leave you with this:

Give thanks to the Lord, for He is good. His mercy endures forever.

Psalm 118:1

Indeed, His mercy endures. Even when I’m busy. Even when I’m distracted. No matter what, He is there. And for that I am thankful.

Soli DEO Gloria!

Image Credit: You Version Bible App

(c) workisministry.com 2019

The Way of a Fool

Have you ever seen a person headed down the wrong path, making decisions in a vacuum, and knowing that this will lead nowhere good? I have, and it can be painful to watch.

“The way of a fool is right in his own eyes, but a wise man is he who listens to counsel.”

Proverbs 12:15

Merriam-Webster offers this definition of a fool: “A person lacking in judgment or prudence.” I call it, “flying blind.”

I have learned over the years, sometimes the hard way, that my idea of how to solve a problem or approach a difficult situation is not necessarily the best idea. I used to be somewhat bull-headed, not always the best listener, and at some point down the course I charted for myself found that I was not where I had intended to be. It is sometimes the School of Hard Knocks at which we learn some of our most valuable life lessons.

Strong leaders are not bull-headed. They do not “fly blind.” They do not chart a course without first gathering all the facts and examining possible options. Strong leaders do not abuse their titles. Do you know people who do this? Have you ever been in a meeting at which the most senior person in the room belligerently states his unfounded opinion as the subject matter experts try to help him see the light? But, through self-importance, pride, or something else, he just will not listen? I have, and sometimes it can almost be comical watching a person make a fool of himself even when I have been the target of another’s belligerence. “Big title, small mind,” I’m tempted to think.

That is exactly the behavior addressed in this Proverb. I am blessed to work with an incredible team of very smart people. Sometimes, difficult situations arise. I am a fool if I address those situations on my own without seeking their counsel and advice. I have experienced countless situations in which the brightest and best idea comes from a surprising source. Strong leaders tap into the talent that surrounds him or her. Setting pride aside, the leader listens to subject matter experts, weights the options, and reaches an informed decision on how to proceed. The strong leader then gives credit where credit is due.

For me, this is a constant life lesson. I am thankful for this reminder from God’s Word on this Monday morning. Now it’s time to take on the week!

Soli DEO Gloria!

Image Credit: YouVersion Bible App

(c) workisministry.com 2019

RIMS 2019 In The Books!

It is good to be home! The national Risk & Insurance Management Society (RIMS) conference is an event to which I look forward every year. It is a very busy week packed with meetings, networking events, good friends and good times. With hardening insurance markets, underwriter meetings at RIMS were somewhat more substantive than in most years, and the timing of RIMS for me was fortuitous as many key insurance partners were in Boston and available for discussion. Indeed, it was a productive week and I am thankful to have attended.

Demonstrating the comaraderie that characterizes our great industry is best done through pictures, so I offer a few here.

Sneak peek at the exhibit hall Sunday afternoon.
Dinner with CorVel Sunday evening at Del Frisco’s Double Eagle. Steak!!
How she got up & down from there I have no clue. Lady on very tall stilts, AIG dessert reception Sunday evening.
Sysco colleague and I outside AIG meeting space Monday. Insurer and broker meeting spaces in the convention center make transitioning between meetings very easy.
Quick meet & greet with ReEmployAbility friends in the exhibit hall.
Since my property renewal wraps up just before RIMS, we started a Tuesday afternoon tradition three RIMS ago of gathering with Houston & London brokers and underwriters to celebrate partnership. Here are Houston & London brokers with our lead Lloyds underwriter.

Chubb offers a nice client appreciation dinner Wednesday evening. Combining casual attire, fine food and an amazing venue (JFK Library) it is the perfect event at which to conclude RIMS. Above I am pictured with two long-time friends (I won’t say how long…) with Chubb and CorVel.

I had some time alone late Wednesday afternoon to enjoy a nice Cakebread Chardonnay and reflect on the events of the week. Only about 30 minutes, I take this time every year to catch my breath and count my blessings. Legal Harborside, Wednesday afternoon.

RIMS is an action-packed, full-calendar event. My rule for survival this year included this mantra:

“Head on the pillow by 11:00”

I achieved that objective each night, which helped me stay on my game during the busy agendas of meetings and events. My color-coded agenda helped keep me on time and (mostly) in the right place!

RIMS 2019 is in the books. Each morning I took time to read Scripture and ask God to help me be a witness in the fast and furious pace that is RIMS. I pray that I mostly achieved that. Now it is time to strap on the Fitbit and get some steps as I seek to shed the 3 pounds I gained over the course of the week!

Soli DEO Gloria!

(c) workisministry.com 2019

Off to RIMS!

After many years of business travel, I still very much enjoy it. As I type this, I am several miles above the earth winging my way to Boston for the annual Risk and Insurance Management Society (RIMS) national conference. RIMS offers risk management professionals a golden opportunity to learn, network, and meet with colleagues and business partners as we eat well and drink well in some of America’s finest cities. As I fly today, I’m looking forward to all of this, but I am also keenly aware that I have a ministry. As I enjoy the comaraderie and festivities that is RIMS I pray that my actions and my words honor my God.

“Create in me a clean heart, O God, and renew a steadfast spirit within me.”

Psalm 51:10

David wrote these words after confessing his sins around his adultery with Bathsheba and subsequent murder of her husband. Trusting God to forgive him, he asked God to cleanse his heart and renew his spirit, seeking to start fresh serving his God and his Lord. Growing up in the Lutheran church, we sang this as part of our response to receiving words of absolution after publicly confessing our sins. It is a statement of faith that allows us to stop looking back and look ahead to better and brighter days to come, thanks to the forgiveness we know through the grace and mercy of our Lord, Jesus Christ.

I hear the question now, “What in the world does this have to do with RIMS?” Well, to be fully transparent I must admit that I tend to get caught up in the festivities. I enjoy them. I hate to miss a good time. The fine food and good wine flow, sometimes to excess, and I like to be right in the middle of it all. It’s fun! But, as I grow older and more mature in my faith, my desire to honor and please God with my words and actions grows stronger. In the past I know I’ve said and done things that dishonor and displease Him. When that happens my witness is tarnished. I don’t want to offer a tarnished witness.

So, with this verse on my mind, off I go. The past is the past and I know I am forgiven for prior sins. As I look ahead to Boston, I am excited to arrive. I fully intend to make the most of RIMS 2019 as I enjoy the meetings, fellowship, relationships, food and, yes, the wine that goes along with it. My prayer is that God gives me the self-awareness and the presence to know when to say when, always remembering that I serve Him, first and foremost.

To my risk management and insurance friends & colleagues, I wish you safe travels to Boston and I look forward to catching up. Have a great conference!

Soli DEO Gloria!

Image credit: YouVersion Bible App

(c) workisministry.com 2019

When in Trouble…

The Psalms offer so much, from cries of despair and repentance to promises of comfort and deliverance. I recently wrote about God’s provision of strength and courage during trying times. Today, God offers rescue:

“Call upon Me in the day of trouble; I shall rescue you, and you will honor Me.”

Psalm 50:15

Our home was one of many flooded by the federal government in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey. We evacuated by boat as the flood waters rose. Kind volunteers with bass boats along with the US Coast Guard helped us and our neighbors safely escape the rising flood. We were dropped off at the entrance to our neighborhood on Memorial Drive. The transportation we were told would be waiting to take us to shelter was nowhere to be seen. Upon asking a police officer sitting in his parked cruiser about that, he replied, “you are on your own.”

I was angry and frustrated. There we stood, rain falling, my wife, my son and I with four wet dogs and a crated cat. We had nowhere to go and no way to get there. I honestly didn’t know what to do. At that moment, a black Cadillac Escalade pulled alongside us. The driver got out of the vehicle and said, “you look like you need a ride. Where can I take you?” I protested, hesitant to load our wet animals into his beautiful SUV. He told me trucks can be cleaned, “get in and we’ll sort this out together.” After about three hours, a change in vehicle (more kind strangers with a jacked-up Dodge pickup truck) and a few phone calls, we were safe and warm at the home of a coworker. Now we could assess our situation and make our plan.

God rescued us that afternoon. He sent that man and his daughter in the black Cadillac to pluck us off the street and escort us to safety. It’s that simple. As sure as my heart beats and my fingers tap this keyboard, I know without a doubt that the events of that Monday afternoon were the work of our loving and rescuing God.

But it doesn’t end with His rescue. There is a tradeoff here. “I shall rescue you and you will honor Me.” My gosh, how will I do that? As I ponder this, I think back to the words of the kind volunteer in the black Cadillac Escalade:

“Get in and we’ll sort this out together.”

Of course, that’s not Scripture, but his words remind me that God is walking with me through this life. He doesn’t leave me to sort this out on my own. God is interested, He has a plan for my life, and when I seek His will through Scripture and prayer, He guides my footsteps. He shows me my strengths and my weaknesses. He helps me sort this out. I started this blog, workisministry.com, as one way of honoring Him. This was His idea, conveyed to me in a moment of prayerful contemplation (See About workiministry.com). I can honor Him by seeking opportunities to serve others. I can honor Him with my words, my attitude, and my conduct. I can honor Him by striving to be salt and light to the world around me. There are plethora of ways I can honor my Lord.

You know, we all need to be rescued. Our greatest need for rescue comes from the condemnation we deserve as the consequence for our sins. Paul writes, “For all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God,” (Romans 3:23). Here is the good news: God has already executed our rescue from sin. Just this past weekend, we celebrated the greatest Sacrifice in history as Jesus gave His life on the cross on Good Friday. Then, Sunday morning, we celebrated the greatest Victory in history as He rose from the dead on the third day, just as He said He would. Indeed, our greatest need for rescue has already been met. All we have to do is believe.

God cares about what happens in your daily life. He cares about what’s happening at work, at home, wherever you might be and whatever situation you may encounter. Sometimes it may seem that He is nowhere to be found, but He is there. Sometimes it may seem that He doesn’t hear our prayers for rescue, but He does. What He promises here, in this succinct little verse, is to hear us when we call and to rescue us from our trouble. Seek Him. Call upon Him. Know that He is God. His ways are not our ways. The rescue may take longer than you’d like and it may come in a way that you did not envision – perhaps in the form of a kind stranger in a black Cadillac – but it will come. It will come.

Soli DEO Gloria!

Image credit: YouVersion Bible App

(c) workisministry.com 2019