I’m glad I’m not like him…

About a year ago, an executive retired from my company and I celebrated his retirement. I didn’t celebrate in a congratulatory way; I celebrated the fact that he was gone and I would no longer have to deal with his haughty tone, his harsh criticism, or his abrupt demeanor. Don’t get me wrong, he was talented in his area of expertise and I respected that. But he could be a total jerk at times. He and I often clashed and I have to confess that I was happy to see him ride off into the sunset. I’m so thankful that I’m not like him…

Luke tells us in verse 9 that Jesus told this parable to a group of people who trusted themselves and deemed themselves righteous. The Pharisee stood in the temple, looked over at a tax collector who stood with his head bowed, and swelled with pride as he prayed this prayer. The tax collector, on the other hand, says this:

“God, be merciful to me, the sinner!”

Luke 18:13

I think if each of us honestly looks inward, we can identify times in which our attitude towards another was like that of the Pharisee. Times when we look upon another person, another child of the Father, and feel thankful that we are not like him or her. This self-righteous attitude is borne of pride and it dishonors the One who created us all. When I think back on the evening I hoisted a glass of champagne and toasted Bjorn’s departure I feel ashamed. Indeed, I was the Pharisee. (Yes, I changed the executive’s name).

(Jesus said), “I tell you, this man (tax collector) went to his house justified rather than the other (Pharisee); for everyone who exalts himself will be humbled, but he who humbles himself will be exalted.

Luke 18:14

Each of us is human, and as such, imperfect. I am imperfect. I wonder sometimes if there are people who feel about me the way I felt about Bjorn. Who have I cut down, dishonored, or hurt? As I read my Bible each morning, I ask God to show me through His Word what a God-honoring life looks like. What attitude does the person who seeks to honor God with his or her life take towards those who can be difficult to deal with at times? How can I be dialed in to my own attitude so that, when the Pharisee in me wants to emerge, I discern it and squelch it?

Merriam-Webster defines “humble” as not proud or haughty; not arrogant or assertive. Jesus tells us here that the one who humbles himself will be “exalted”. The humble, according to Jesus, will be elevated in rank, power, or character as defined by Merriam-Webster. Many business owners and executives that I know and admire consistently approach their work with an attitude of humility. I look up to them and I respect them. Indeed, approaching life, even at work, with an attitude of humility pleases and honors God. Indeed, the one who humbles himself or herself is exalted in the eyes of God. That is huge.

A mentor early in my career offered some good advice that I try to follow to this day. He said to take note of the traits that I admire in coworkers and executives and seek to emulate them in my dealings with others in my daily work. Humility is one of the traits I admire the most. I am convinced of these things: Servant leadership is borne of humility. Mentoring others is borne of humility. Offering praise for a job well done is borne of humility. Deferring to those in authority, even when they may be difficult to deal with, is borne of humility. Humble. This is the man – the husband, father, employee, coworker, and boss – that I aspire to be.

Soli DEO Gloria!

Photo Credit: YouVersion Bible App

(c) workisministry.com 2020

Happy New (Work) Year!

Why do we work? Our impulsive answer to this question may be something like, “to put food on the table, numbskull!”

While that is certainly true, there is a bigger, more important reason behind the work that we do each day. Work is mentioned many times in Scripture, beginning with…the beginning:

“The Lord God took the man and put him in the Garden of Eden to work it and take care of it.” ~ Genesis 2:15 NIV

You see, God did not create Adam to simply exist in the beautiful world God created. Not at all. After creating Adam, God immediately gave him work to do, a vocation if you will. God put Adam in charge of His creation. Adam’s calling was to cultivate (work) the garden and keep (take care of) it. But this passage is not just about the Adam of Genesis. Did you know that “adam” is the Hebrew word for “mankind”? That’s right – this passage is about you and me, too.Have you ever thought of your daily work in this context? Have you considered the notion that God has called you to do what you do each day for a reason? That your calling, or vocation, is actually a gift from God given to you as a means of caring for His creation? This is a game changer! When we understand that our work is given to us by God, it repositions everything. What was once drudgery is now a pleasure. What was once mundane is now exciting. What was once considered unimportant is now critical. What was once viewed as a job is now a calling, a vocation, from God.Of course, none of us are in the Garden of Eden. Some of us work in office buildings, some in schools, some in restaurants, some in stores, some in warehouses, some behind a wheel, some at home, some outdoors… No matter where you work or what you do for a living, know this: You are surrounded by God’s creation. Each day presents an opportunity to make a difference. You can influence your world for Christ. At work. Every day.Next time you are in your work place, take a look around. Every person you see is a child of God. Some know it, some don’t. Let’s join together as followers of Jesus and commit our work in this New Year and beyond to Him. Let’s do all that we do knowing that He has each of us where we are for a reason. If we will work in this way, God will work through us to cultivate and reap His harvest.

Happy New Year!Soli DEO Gloria

Image Credit: YouVersion Bible App

(c) workisministry.com 2019